Hemp Seed Baby Food | When to Feed, How to Feed and Why It Is So Gosh Darn Good For You

 baby food how to, baby's first foods, Moms Want to Know About, seeds, Super Porridge  Comments Off on Hemp Seed Baby Food | When to Feed, How to Feed and Why It Is So Gosh Darn Good For You
Apr 142015
 

Can I add hulled hemp seeds to my baby’s diet

Yes. Hulled hemp seeds, (also called hemp hearts) pose little to no allergy risk to your little one (check with your pediatrician but 7-8 months old should be a good starting point) Hemp seeds are super good for baby and packed with plant nutrition. They have protein, omega fatty acid and antioxidants. Hemp seeds have a mild nutty flavor and are a great addition to almost any baby food and toddler food.

Ideas for serving hemp seeds to baby and toddler

Hemp seeds are best served raw to protect its nutrients. They are sold already hulled and ready to add to your favorite baby and toddler food. Serving sizes depend on the age of your baby.  A teaspoon or two of hemp hearts are a good starting point. As your baby gets older, keep in mind that three tablespoons of hemp hearts are considered a serving size and contain 10 grams of protein – the daily allowance for a 1 to 3 year old, so from ages one to three there is no need to exceed three tablespoons of hemp hearts.  See this cool chart on recommended daily allowances of protein by age from hempinformer.com. Hemp hearts can be added to yogurt, applesauce, super porridge, smashed banana, smashed avocado …most anything.  They can even be eaten straight from the plate. (or the spoon as the case may be.)  There is also hemp powder and hemp milk available for other ways to get hemp into your baby’s diet.  Hemp powder is easy to sprinkle on almost anything.  Hemp milk can be mixed into super porridge or added to fruit for a smoothie.

 Why is hemp so good for baby (and you, too)

Hemp is a great source of protein and Omega 3 as we have mentioned.  We know protein gives us longer energy but why are omega 3’s so important to our health? TheSweetbeet.com reminds us that omega 3 offers ” enhanced brain functioning (our brain is 60% fat, and half of that is DHA – an Omega 3), improved blood circulation, strengthened immunity, lower incidence of inflammation and healthier eyes.”  Sold yet?  Hemp also packs a heavier punch on the protein front than flax seed and almonds, two heavy hitters in their own right.  For parents, hemp hearts can be sprinkled on salads, soups and vegetables.

Have you had good experience with hemp seeds?  Share them with us.

 

May 172014
 

Feeding baby is about more than just baby food

If you are a fan of Super Baby Food you know that feeding your baby and toddler is not simply for nutrition but also for supporting development, learning, and bonding with Mom and Dad.  In addition to the signs of readiness that must be present to begin “solid” food, there are some additional “fun” guidelines for when you get started feeding solid foods, too.  One of my favorites, “Do Play with Your Food,’ allows parents and caregivers to “let go” a bit at feeding time allowing baby to develop, explore, and discover on his own in addition to adding to his nutrition.  In this post, I elaborate on the “Do Play With Your Food” directive  AND include a fun recipe that illustrates the point – “Canoes for Riding the Rapids” featuring banana, tofu, ground seeds, and wheat germ.

DO Play with Your Food

Babies are messy eaters. It is perfectly normal for a baby to dip his fingers into bowls of food, suck his fingers and fist, squeeze and smear food onto his face and the tray with his palm and fingers, mash it into his hair, spit it out or let it drool down his chin, blow it at you or on the wall, throw it on the floor along with cups and bowls, and spill his drinks. Be assured that to everything, there is a learning purpose. Your baby is not doing these things to provoke you—he is experimenting and learning about his environment and the texture and feel of his food. She explores her food just as she explores her toys. Restrain your impulse to be neat and encourage self-feeding. Your baby doesn’t need Miss Manners’ approval.

The right recipe can make eating and learning fun

Try this recipe for your older baby (>1 year) or toddler and watch as he discovers and learns all while eating great food!

Canoes for Riding the Rapids

A slightly curved, shorter banana is good for this recipe. Wash the outside of a banana. Make a vertical slit down one side of the unpeeled banana leaving about 1⁄2 inch uncut at each end. If the banana is curved, make the slit on the “upside” so that it’s shaped like a canoe. Open slit and carefully scoop out the flesh.

Fork-mash half of the banana and mix with 1⁄2 cup of mashed tofu, 2 tablespoons of ground seeds, 1 tablespoon of wheat germ, and honey to taste. Spread banana peel open gently and make bottom of canoe flat by pressing with fingers so that it will be stable, being careful not to rip ends.

Return mixture to inside of banana. You can trim around the slit with a sharp knife to make the opening wider.

Use the other half of the banana flesh to shape fish and rocks, roll in wheat germ, and place them around the canoe. These “dangerous” rocks must be avoided to prevent the canoe from breaking apart.

Make oars out of carrot or celery sticks.

Please feel free to add your own recipes that allow baby to play with his food!

Chia Seeds, Flax Seeds, and Tahini Super Baby Food | How-to and Nutritional values

 baby cereal, baby's first foods, Moms Want to Know About, seeds, Super Baby Food  Comments Off on Chia Seeds, Flax Seeds, and Tahini Super Baby Food | How-to and Nutritional values
Nov 112013
 

 

Seeds are a super healthy part of your baby’s Super Food Diet

Seeds may be the very last food on a parent’s list when considering first solid foods for their baby and then later, their toddler.  They might want take another look at seeds and add them to the very top of their list! Seeds are jammed packed with precious nutrients that can provide an easy healthy boost to any meal.

The history of the seed

It makes sense that seeds are chock full of goodies.  Think about it. If a seed is placed in the ground, it grows! If a seed is placed in water, it sprouts! Nature must have put a concentrated store of nutrients in the seed, which can grow a new plant with no soil and nothing more than plain water.    The seed is the nucleus of a plant, the part that maintains survival of the species, and the part that is most important to nature.  If there is a variation and lack of nutrients in the soil, the other plant parts suffer at the expense of the seed.  In infertile soil, the roots forage for every trace nutrient they can find in order to first form the seed.  The seed is life itself! Fascinating, is it not?

How to add seeds to your baby’s prepared food

There are many seeds that you could add to your child’s diet.  I would like to share three in this post: chia seeds, seasame seeds (in the form of tahini), and flax seeds. Most pediatricians agree that you can add these three seeds (one of a time, of course) to your baby’s diet at eight months of age.  Check with your pediatrican before feeding as always.  I suggest grinding chia seeds and flax seeds immediately before serving to your baby, as the unground seed could be a choking hazard and the most nutitinonal value will be delivered when the seeds are ground.  As well, seeds become rancid quickly so best to grind and serve!

Chia Seeds, Flax Seeds, and Tahini (seasame seeds in paste form)

Chia Seed Nutritional Value

Chia seeds have become very popular and it is no wonder.  Just some of the nutritional benefits of chia seeds include: Omega 3 Fatty Acid, anti-oxidants, fiber, and protein. Grind chia seeds to a fine powder and sprinkle on your baby’s yogurt, oatmeal super porridge, and atop soft or pureed fruit.

Flax Seeds

Flax seeds contain omega 3 fats, manganese, Vitamin B1 and antioxidant properties, just to name a few of its goodies.  I recommend grinding flax seeds in a blender immediately before feeding and then add to scrambled eggs, yogurt, pancakes, etc.

Tahini (Seasame Seeds in paste form)

Tahini touts iron, calcium, phosphorous, zinc, B1, and dietary fiber as a few of it’s beneficial nutrients. Since tahini is sesame seeds ground into a butter it is super convenient to easily add to your baby’s yogurt, super porridge, practically anything that you can add a spread to!

If  you have experience feeding seeds to YOUR baby, share what you have found works best.  What other foods can you stir ground seeds into?