Jan 172014
 

Happy New year, Super Baby Food fans! It is a whole new year and you have decided to try making your own baby food. Good for you and your family!  You will soon learn that it is much easier than you thought to make organic, homemade, tasty baby food.  Before you get started, though, here are a few safety measures to keep in mind and put into practice when making your own baby food.  For those of you who already do make your own baby food, consider this a mini-refresher course.  Please add your own additional safety ideas and tips in the comment section.

Baby Food Preparation Safety TIps

  • Wash your hands…So simple, I know, but always the first step!  Wash, wash, wash!
  • Wash your produce – both fruits and vegetables – even if it is organic…wash, wash, wash.  As you may already know some fruits and vegetables are ‘dirtier” than others…Check out EWG’s dirty dozen and clean 15 for a refresher.
  • Thoroughly clean all food preparation surface areas and utensils with hot, soapy water – the counter surfaces, the high chair tray surface and all of your utensils and operating equipment, including blenders, food processors, etc. (For more information on high chair safety click on the link.)
  • Beware of bacteria! Moisture and warmth can equal bacterial growth! Yuck! To get food cooled as quickly as possible, store it in small and/or shallow containers (you know from the 3rd edition of Super Baby Food that I prefer glass or stainless steel containers)
  • Do not leave prepared baby food at room temperature for more than a few minutes. Serve it right away or freeze it for later use.
  • Thaw all foods in the refrigerator and never refreeze food that has been cooked then frozen and then thawed.

Baby Food Precautions

  • Baby food can be spoiled without necessarily smelling bad. When in doubt, throw it out.
  • Any leftover homemade or commercial baby food or juice that has come in contact with your baby’s saliva must be discarded.
  • Commercial baby food jars (I know you are only using commercial baby food in a pinch;)) must “pop” when opened to insure the content’s freshness!
  • If commercial infant/baby/toddler cereal has been mixed with liquid, serve it immediately and discard the leftovers.

For many more safety tips on baby food preparation safety and baby food safety, be sure to check out the new edition of  Super Baby Food, now available on Smashwords!  There are  three chapters in an entire section of the book dedicated to safety. It is very important! Please share your own safety tips developed along the way with me!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mar 302011
 

You’ve checked out all the signs for readiness and your feeding area is welcoming and safe.  It’s time for your baby’s very first “solid” food meal!  Here are some tips to make sure that your baby’s very first meal is a success.

The best time to give your baby her very first meal is in the morning or early afternoon.

  • Give the first meal when your baby is not too hungry.  A too-hungry baby urgently wanting to eat may become frustrated during this new unfamiliar eating method.
  • Feed first meal after he has had a partial breast or bottle feeding. Give him half a feeding, then introduce his first solid food, and then finish the feeding.
  • The temperature of your baby’s food should be moderately warm.
  • The first meal will be very little food, no more than a teaspoon or two.
  • The consistency of the first solid food will not be solid, it will be much more liquid than solid.
  • When ready and comfortable, place a pea-sized amount of the liquidy food on the spoon, place the spoon lightly on your baby’s lower lip and slip it gently into his mouth, so that it is on the top of his tongue.  Let him suck the food off the lower spoon.  If he doesn’t suck, then tip the spoon so that the food pours slowly into his mouth.
  • Whatever happens, smile and say, “Mmmm!!!”
  • Watch for signs that you should end the meal, when the food is gone or when she turns her head away and closes her little mouth when she sees the spoon coming.

Check out his cute You Tube video of a baby’s first meal.  Watch how the Mom incorporates many of tips described above.

Mar 102011
 

Feeding solid foods is such an important milestone in you and your baby’s life.  It is always important to remember safety first.  Below are some safety tips for feeding baby solids.

  • Make sure that wall mountings, electrical outlets, and objects on counter tops are out of baby’s reach from the feeding chair.
  • Your baby should not be able to grab something and use it for leverage to tip chair over.
  • Never leave your baby alone in a high chair.
  • Never allow older children to play in baby’s high chair or hang onto it.
  • Always use the full restraint system including the waist and middle straps when seating baby in the high chair- never use just the tray alone.
  • Remember to clean the chair and the restraint system on a regular basis.
  • Your baby should be seated in an upright position in the high chair or infant seat in order to prevent choking during eating
  • Remember to stop using the seat when your child has reached the recommended maximum height or weight.

For more safety tips while feeding solids check out the Super Baby Food App (available for free for a limited time), check out Super Baby Food or check back to the blog!