Jan 282012
 

Dr Greene.com recently asked Ruth to be a special guest perspectives blogger on their informational website.  Ruth was more than happy to provide 5 terrific blog posts sharing all kinds of great, detailed information on finger foods and tips for getting started with finger foods for babies and toddlers. In case you missed it, here is a description and a link to each fantastic blog post.

Finger Foods: What They Are And Why They Are Important To Your Baby’s Diet

Getting Started With Finger Foods

Finger Food Ideas For Baby and Toddler: Fruits, Whole Grains, and Vegetables

Baby and Toddler Finger Food Ideas Galore: Proteins, Dairy, Omega 3 Healthy Fats

Baby and Toddler Finger Food Ideas Galore: Seeds and Dips

Super Baby Food is happy to be a part of the Dr. Greene team! Be sure to check out some of the other terrific information on Dr. Greene’s website.

Jun 052011
 
raw-dairy-products-for-baby

Moms Are Talking About…

Raw Dairy Products for Their Baby.  We asked Ruth, Are raw dairy products  safe to feed to baby?

Ruth says:

In a word – “Nope”

Here’s why:

Milk and cheese made from raw milk have not been pasteurized–heated sufficiently to kill dangerous bacteria. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Dietetic Association say to NOT feed any baby milk, cheese, or any dairy products that are raw (have not been pasteurized).  Babies’ immune systems are not mature enough to fight bacteria that might have contaminated them and some bacteria could be lethal.  Anyone who is “immunocompromised” should not eat raw dairy products, including babies and young children, the elderly, and those with an illness.  And I believe the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommend that NO ONE, even very healthy adults, should eat raw dairy products, especially those who are immunocompromised.

May 262011
 

Moms Are Talking About…

Feeding Cottage Cheese to Your Baby

Cottage Cheese baby foodThe American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends dairy products (yogurt, natural cheeses, cottage cheese) made from whole milk because babies need fats.  As for all new foods, use the four-day wait rule.  Keep in mind that these fats are the saturated kind, which should be minimized in older children’s diets.  So when your baby becomes a toddler at age 1-2 years, you may want to switch to low-fat or non-fat dairy products, depending on which your professional baby care provider recommends and the age to switch.  I recommend buying only ORGANIC dairy products, which are from cows that are not treated with antibiotics or BVG (bovine growth hormone) and graze on grass with no pesticides.

Although it’s OK to give your child dairy products like yogurt and cheese made from cow’s milk, do not feed cow’s milk itself to your baby until s/he is one year old.  Until one year, give your baby breastmilk or formula and no cow’s milk, because cow’s milk protein is different from the protein in breastmilk/formula.  Be sure all dairy and cheeses you give to your baby are pasteurized and not made from raw milk.  Start your baby on dairy only if there are no milk allergies in the family–consult your pediatrician as to whether to introduce dairy to your baby.  In fact, if there are ANY allergies in the family (food allergies, asthma, pollen, etc.) , especially in the immediate family, discuss them thoroughly with your baby care povider.

By the way, if you haven’t given yogurt or kefir to your baby yet, you may wish to choose these dairy products over cottage cheese because they have the healthy bacteria so necessary for your baby’s digestive and immune systems.

For more information on dairy products and your baby, check Super Baby Food or right back her at the Super Baby Food Blog.