May 262011
 

Moms Are Talking About…

Feeding Cottage Cheese to Your Baby

Cottage Cheese baby foodThe American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends dairy products (yogurt, natural cheeses, cottage cheese) made from whole milk because babies need fats.  As for all new foods, use the four-day wait rule.  Keep in mind that these fats are the saturated kind, which should be minimized in older children’s diets.  So when your baby becomes a toddler at age 1-2 years, you may want to switch to low-fat or non-fat dairy products, depending on which your professional baby care provider recommends and the age to switch.  I recommend buying only ORGANIC dairy products, which are from cows that are not treated with antibiotics or BVG (bovine growth hormone) and graze on grass with no pesticides.

Although it’s OK to give your child dairy products like yogurt and cheese made from cow’s milk, do not feed cow’s milk itself to your baby until s/he is one year old.  Until one year, give your baby breastmilk or formula and no cow’s milk, because cow’s milk protein is different from the protein in breastmilk/formula.  Be sure all dairy and cheeses you give to your baby are pasteurized and not made from raw milk.  Start your baby on dairy only if there are no milk allergies in the family–consult your pediatrician as to whether to introduce dairy to your baby.  In fact, if there are ANY allergies in the family (food allergies, asthma, pollen, etc.) , especially in the immediate family, discuss them thoroughly with your baby care povider.

By the way, if you haven’t given yogurt or kefir to your baby yet, you may wish to choose these dairy products over cottage cheese because they have the healthy bacteria so necessary for your baby’s digestive and immune systems.

For more information on dairy products and your baby, check Super Baby Food or right back her at the Super Baby Food Blog.

May 122011
 

A mom had a question on the Super Baby Food Facebook Page about feeding a baby radishes!

Are radishes OK to feed a baby?

Here is what Ruth had to say:

Radishes technically are OK to give to a 9 month old, but I would suggest giving very little and very well diced – use a garlic press and knife to get it into the smallest pieces.  Radishes might cause stomach upset and may be difficult for your baby’s immature system to digest.  Try just a little tiny pea-sized bit and wait a day or so to see if your baby has any reaction.

Use only organic radishes and herbs and spices.

You can add herbs and spices anytime after 6 months, but I would first start with spices that are not hot.  Try a little cinnamon, or ginger first, then move on to turmeric (a SUPER spice loaded with good stuff), cumin, and others.  Stay away from the hot ones, such as cayenne pepper and garlic, for a while.  Introduce in very small quantities and, as always for new foods, use the 4-day wait rule.  Spices are loaded with antioxidants and are super foods, however, do NOT use imported spices, as they may have heavy metals (lead, mercury) in them.

I like the Frontier brand.  All their spices are organic and you can find them at the natural foods store or large grocery stores like Wegman’s.
http://www.frontiercoop.com/products/spices.php

TIP: If your mouth gets too hot from hot or peppery spices, cool it down with milk, which cools better than water or juice.

Thanks for writing!

Does anyone else have a question regarding a vegetable?  Send them to Ruth!

Mar 312011
 

Your beginner eater has had her very first meal.  It’s now day two of solid foods and she is ready for another meal.   For the first week, give her one meal each day consisting of one single food – the same food you fed to her in her very first meal.  Give her some breast milk or formula before the solid food so that she is not too hungry when you spoon-feed her.   After she finishes the food you can give her the rest of the breast or formula.  For the first few days, each meal should be no more that a tablespoon before mixing with liquid.

At the beginning of the second week of solid foods, introduce your baby to one new food from the list below.  Wait 4-7 days (The Four Day Wait Rule) and watch for allergy symptoms before introducing another food.

  • ripe avocado
  • ripe banana
  • sweet potato
  • yogurt, whole-milk (6 months or older)
  • commercial, iron-fortified single-grain cereals: rice, barley, millet, oatmeal
  • mild fruits, cooked and strained apricots, nectarines, peaches, pears, plums, prunes

For more details on feeding baby his first solid meals check out  Super Baby Food or check back to the blog for more informative blog posts!

Feb 252011
 

Here is the “Four-day Wait Rule” described in Super Baby Food:

Introduce only one new food at a time.  After you introduce your baby to a new food, do not introduce another new food for at least four days.  During the 4-day waiting period, watch carefully for signs of allergies.

Note: Some experts recommend a 3-day waiting period, some recommend waiting 5 days, and still others recommend a full week of waiting between new foods. Consult with your pediatrician and follow his recommendation.