Apr 062011
 

Every parent’s worst nightmare is a baby who they fear is not eating enough.  If you feel that something is wrong with your baby’s eating habits and/or his weight is dropping, your first stop, as always, is with your pediatrician.  You might also find a registered dietitian in your area.  This site will help you find one: EatRight.org.

Your baby should be physically growing and learning skills and milestones.  Is he meeting his developmental milestones? You may want to pick up a copy of this book from your local library: The Wonder years: Helping Your Baby and Young Child Successfully Negotiate The Major Developmental Milestones by the American Academy of Pediatrics.  I get a lot of emails from the parents of picky eaters and it is almost always the case that they begin eating lots of food after the age of 8 months when they start moving.  Is your baby crawling a lot?  The more babies move, the hungrier they get and the more they should eat for all the extra energy they need.

There are some great books on picky eaters, too.  Try Food Chaining, it talks about the difference between picky eaters and children who have serious eating disorders.  Whatever you decide to do, make sure you keep your pediatrician involved.

Mar 232011
 

In a previous post, we outlined the Super Baby Food Food Cube Freezing method.  Freezing food is an important step. Thawing the food is the next important step.  It’s important to thaw the food “safely.”  “Safely” here has two meanings.  First, baby food should be thawed in a way which prevents bacterial growth.  Baby food should never be thawed at room temperature, and baby food should not be kept at room temperature for more than several minutes.  Second, “safely” means thawing baby food so that it is not too hot or too cold to be a danger to your baby.  If it’s too hot, it may burn your baby’s mouth.  If it is too cold, and therefore not thawed thoroughly, it may contain frozen food chunks that are choking hazards to your baby.  Food that is too cold may also “burn” your baby’s sensitive mouth.  In thawing food, you simply want to take the chill out of baby’s food, you don’t want to make it hot.

Here are a few ways to safely thaw those frozen baby food cubes:

Thaw Food Cubes on the Stove Top:

Place frozen food cube in a pot and thaw over very low heat stirring often.  A double broiler can also be used.  This method takes a while so begin to warm the cubes 15 minutes to 1/2 hour before mealtime.

Thaw Food Cubes in the refrigerator:

Thaw overnight in the refrigerator.  Be sure to stir insuring that no frozen chunks are left.  If you need to warm the food a bit, place container in a larger container with hot tap water.

Thaw Food Cubes In the Microwave:

Many experts recommend avoiding the microwave altogether because of the uneven heating that microwaves are notorious for.  It’s a fact that parents use the microwave regardless so, if you are going to use the microwave to thaw, be careful.  Place the frozen cubes in a little microwave-safe bowl.  With experience you will know exactly how long to thaw a frozen cube, probably between 30 seconds and a minute.  Once thawed almost all the way through, mash the remaining cube to even out the temperature.

Here are a few tips to make sure that baby’s food will be safe for baby to eat:

  • Stir, stir, stir baby food thoroughly to distribute heat
  • Always test the temperature of your baby’s food BEFORE feeding to your baby
  • Never re-freeze thawed baby food!

For additional information, check out Super Baby Food and check back with us here at the Super Baby Food blog.  Remember to subscribe to our feed to keep up with informative blog posts!

Mar 102011
 

Feeding solid foods is such an important milestone in you and your baby’s life.  It is always important to remember safety first.  Below are some safety tips for feeding baby solids.

  • Make sure that wall mountings, electrical outlets, and objects on counter tops are out of baby’s reach from the feeding chair.
  • Your baby should not be able to grab something and use it for leverage to tip chair over.
  • Never leave your baby alone in a high chair.
  • Never allow older children to play in baby’s high chair or hang onto it.
  • Always use the full restraint system including the waist and middle straps when seating baby in the high chair- never use just the tray alone.
  • Remember to clean the chair and the restraint system on a regular basis.
  • Your baby should be seated in an upright position in the high chair or infant seat in order to prevent choking during eating
  • Remember to stop using the seat when your child has reached the recommended maximum height or weight.

For more safety tips while feeding solids check out the Super Baby Food App (available for free for a limited time), check out Super Baby Food or check back to the blog!