Dec 112014
 

Kale is a super duper green and can be fed to baby, cooked, at 9 months old.  Raw kale should not be fed before your baby is 10 months old.  You already know that kale is crazy-good for you and your baby.  Here’s why: It has phytonutrients, crazy amounts of vitamin K, fiber, iron, and calcium. “Phytonutrients are certain organic components of plants, and these components are thought to promote human health. Fruits, vegetables, grains, legumes, nuts and teas are rich sources of phytonutrients.”

Kale has a very strong flavor, though, so add a cube to super   porridge or mix with banana to make it deliciously palatable for baby!

    Kale Puree Recipe:
   (Also found in Super Baby Food, 3rd edition)
    To prepare Kale Baby Food:
  • swish Kale leaves in a sink full of cold water
  • remove the stems –I go into a detailed method for removing the stems that is detailed (and entertaining) on p. 195.
  • Chop into bite sized pieces
  • Steam the kale leaves or sauté in 1/2 cup boiling water in a large shallow pan. (a frying pan)
  • Stir just until kale leaves turn bright green.
  • Remove from pan and place in blender (blend in the water from the leaves)
  • Puree and freeze using the Food Cube Method for up to 2 months.

Share your kale baby food puree recipes, tips and/or food combinations.

 

 

Amara Organic Dried Baby Food Apple and Banana Giveaway *Closed*

 baby's first foods, giveaway, Moms Want to Know About, organic baby food  Comments Off on Amara Organic Dried Baby Food Apple and Banana Giveaway *Closed*
Mar 132014
 

This Giveaway is Closed..Winners shown below.  Thanks for participating!

I am so lucky to be exposed to some terrific baby food products because of the writing of Super Baby Food.   One of those great products is Amara, an organic dried baby food product.  Busy moms are always looking for ways to feed on the go when necessary – for day trips or traveling or simply when in a pinch.  Amara organic food pouches are a convenient, clever way to feed baby organic food.  With this giveaway, Amara is offering five winners their apple and  banana baby food pouches.

Amara dried organic food is easy to prepare. Amara tells us, “Simply add breast milk, formula, or water and it’s ready for your baby to eat! Our lightweight pouch slips into your pocket or purse and is the perfect way to guarantee a wholesome meal for your baby without the hassle.”

You can learn more about Amara and the products they offer at their baby food link.

The Amara  giveaway will reward five winners each with both a banana and an apple serving. Giveaway begins today and ends March 20th at midnight…tell all your friends!  Winners must live in US  or Canada to be eligible to win!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Dec 042013
 

Spirulina Powder

Spirulina is a nutritional enhancer that can be added to baby food (and adult food) and adds super nutrition to any meal. It is a blue green algae that springs from warm, fresh water bodies. This sounds exotic, but was is really exotic is what it can do for your baby and for you! Spirulina is a terrific source of protein, reinforces the immune system, protects folks from cancer, contains GLA, an essential fatty acid that is found only in mother’s milk and is a fabulous source of vitamin B and B complex to boot.

It is very easy to add spirulina to baby food and adult meals, simply sprinkle into your recipe and let the nutritional benefits abound.  For baby, at about 6 months (ask your pediatrician, of course), start with just 1/4-1/2 teaspoon stirred into pureed foods, cereal and/or smoothies! For adults, try 1 to 2 teaspoons a day.  Spirulina powder, like as found at GNC (Spiru-Tein) is also a popular way for adults to add spirulina to their diets!  Just add one scoop and you are ready to go.

As if the nutritional benefits were not enough to get you excited about adding spirulina to your diet, I found an article by terranut.com that extols the following benefits of Spirulina, you can read the entire article at the link.

Terranut tells us that spirulina benefits include:

1 Cleansing: Spirulina promotes the body natural cleansing processes. You feel fitter, more cheerful, and you have more energy.

2. Restoring: Spirulina compensates for deficiencies in the diet and stimulates the metabolism. Your physical condition improves noticeably and you recover faster after exertion.

3. Fortifying: Spirulina boosts resistance and activates the body natural defense mechanisms. You feel stronger and are better able to cope with the pressures of everyday life.

Because of its cleansing, restoring and fortifying functions, Spirulina has a wide range of applications. It gives you new energy without taking pep-ups and makes you more alert and stable.

I know you are excited now!  Who does not want to feel peppy and more alert and stable.

To feed spirulina to baby try combining:

1/4 Cup applesauce

1/2 tsp spirulina

1/2 mashed avocado

As you can guess by the above example, the possibilities for baby food recipes using spirulina are endless.  Mamanatural.com posts a fantastic recipe for a tropical spirulina smoothie that she swears her picky baby loves! If you would like more example of adult spirulina recipes, I found a post by naturalhealthychoices.weebly.com that lists several great ones including Spirulina Salsa, Guacamole, and Vegetable spirulina Stir Fry.

Have you discovered any great spirulina baby food recipes?  Share them!

 

 

Mar 112012
 

On CBS’s Sunday morning this past week, Cindy Crawford was featured. We love Cindy Crawford and not just because she is a fan of Super Baby Food and appeared with Ruth Yaron on a segment of Good Morning America, but also because she’s a wonderful gal..smart, bright, caring, and a giver.

The recent piece on CBS’s Sunday Morning highlighted Cindy Crawford’s charity work in honor of her brother who died at a young age from Leukemia. She is genuinely beautiful on the inside and out.

We thought it would be appropriate to share the segment of Good Morning America where Cindy teaches Charlie Gibson, and of course, the audience, how to make our favorite, Super Porridge! Enjoy!

Nov 152011
 

In a recent comment a mom asks about dessicated liver.  We thought it was a great question and that we would ask Ruth for her thoughts…

The mom asks:

I really love your book. Thanks for such a great work.

I’d like to start using desiccated liver powder for my 8 months old daughter but I cant find the powder version of it,  all I can find is the tablet version.

Can you recommend a brand/company who makes powder form of the desiccated liver?

Thnx.

Ruth Says:

Desiccated liver is a powdered nutritional supplement made from dried liver.  It is high in vitamin B12 (a nutrient sometimes claimed to be lacking in vegetarian diets) and other B vitamins. You can introduce desiccated liver to your baby beginning at about 8 months.  Add 1/2 to 1 teaspoon to your baby’s  Super Porridge daily or several times a week to make up for whatever you feel your baby would be missing in a meatless diet.

I recommend the Now brand. Please go light on the liver powder so baby does not get too much iron.  The nutrition section of Super Baby Food discusses the daily recommended amounts of iron.  The iron is “heme” iron and is very well-absorbed, unlike iron from plants.  You can also buy the tablets and crush them by putting them in ziploc bag and crushing with a spoon

Check back at the Super Baby Food Blog for more information for feeding your baby the very best!

Sep 282011
 

A Fan of Super Baby Food took the time to write a nice note expressing the reasons she loves Super Baby Food.  We hope you enjoy it as much as we did.  Thank you, Dacia, for your permission to reprint your kind words.

I just want you to know what an immense impact your book has made on my life.  I’m a research nut & the book saved me a lot of time.  Not only useful information, but well organized, user friendly and all-encompassing for all viewpoints or opinions.  The second reason it has impacted me is the support it has given me in embarking on homemade food & fully immersed nutrition.  Our society has evolved into consumers and we’ve become much too separated from our children’s nutrition.  I wanted to breast feed very badly and when I decided to make my own super baby food, I discovered the uncanny parallels the two have as far as stigmas and barriers.  I found support for breast feeding and now I’ve found support for super baby food & beyond.  What I’ve learned will go far beyond my child’s nutrition and even past our own dinner plates.

A couple years ago, my brother had mentioned possibly making his own baby food.  My silent reaction was “you can’t do that, it’s not that simple, baby food is fortified…”  Then I had my son 6 months ago and made my research and decisions.  I went to Borders and piled up 20 books to sift through before choosing yours since it wasn’t all pictures and glossy pages – LOTS of info and that’s it.  Then I went to the family meet & greet for my son’s daycare enrollment & they stated they provide Gerber foods.  I asked if I could bring my own in.  They just about gasped and said, well maybe if you had a Doctor’s note…  Can you believe it!  I pushed and spoke to the Director and they agreed if I would label the ingredients.  THEN, the following week, the teachers all huddled around me and detained me for a half an hour inquiring excitedly about home made baby food.  They just couldn’t get over how wonderful it was all of a sudden.  I’m glad I turned them on to it and plan on buying his two teachers copies of your book for Christmas.

I apologize for the windy feedback, but I really thought you’d enjoy the story as well.  Thanks for your work and for your time!

Dacia Volz
Dunmore, PA

Can anyone provide more words of support for Dacia?  Has anyone run in to the kind of reaction Dacia did at her day care regarding baby food?  How did you handle it?

Aug 302011
 

You have spoken and we have listened.  We proudly present the Super Baby Food Daily Menu of the Super Baby Food Diet free for you to download at your leisure. In the second edition of  Super Baby Food, this sample menu is found on page 136.

This is our most recent download.  For other Super Baby Food Resources including the  The Super Baby Food Diet Daily Worksheet, check Ruth’s blog page “resources” under “about the book!”

We know the sample menu will help your meet all your Super Baby feeding needs! 

Aug 052011
 

A Mom Asks:

I am just beginning to feed my second child solid foods using your Super Baby Food book as a guide. Our CSA share this week included “vitamin greens” and I am wondering if they can be prepared as other greens and fed to my son when he is old enough for cooked greens. I also wonder about “bok choy”.  Thank you for your help, and for writing such an excellent resource for parents.

Ruth Says:

Vitamin greens (I don’t why they call them that since all green leafy vegetables are loaded with vitamins) and bok choy should be introduced to your baby just as any other veggies.  Use the 4-day wait rule.

Cook as you would kale.  Thanks for writing!

Jul 152011
 

A mom asks Ruth:

“You don’t mention phytic acid in your book (Super Baby Food), but I have read that its presence in whole grains can limit the absorption of nutrients.  Do you recommend sprouting grains before grinding them for super baby porridge, or soaking?  Thank you!

Ruth says:

Great question!  Actually, I sometimes do sprout my own grains before using them to bake bread or for porridge so that the phytic acid goes away and so that the nutrient content increases.  I also grind my own grains into flour for baking using the Whisper Mill or the Nutrimill grain grinders.  Grains must be totally dry before you use a grain mill or it gets ruined. I use an Excalibur dehydrator to dry my sprouted grains before grinding in my mill.

When soaked, the phytic acid takes a while to go away if the grains are whole kernels–about 8-12 hours.  However, the grains for Super Porridge are first ground to a powder, not a fine powder, but a powder.  The finer the powder, the faster the phytic acid disappears because more water comes into contact with the surface area of the powder.  For well-ground flour like you would use in breads, it takes only 5 minutes of soaking to remove the phytic acid.

Grinding the grains to a course powder is perfect for Super Porridge. Much of the phytic acid goes away when boiled in water, but some may remain.  Phytic acid is a phytonutrient that is good for us, so we should get some of it in our diets.

Because Super Porridge is only coarsely ground, it is low on the glycemic index scale, which is good.  The lower the GI, the better the food is for us because it doesn’t shoot up blood sugar and cause the pancreas to quickly produce lots of insulin.  An overworked pancreas can lead to insulin resistance and maybe even full-blown diabetes.

So the bottom line is, you can sprout your grains, but only for a day or so because otherwise they will be too difficult to grind with longer sprouts.  And the grains must be totally dry before you grind them.  If you don’t have a dehydrator, you can dry them in a low oven- at about 200 degrees so that all bacteria that might start growing are killed.

Happy sprouting and grinding!  Thanks for writing!


Jul 062011
 

When you start a baby on solid food for the very time, it is not always smooth sailing.  Here’s a question from a mom about starting her second baby on solid food and Ruth’s answer.  Maybe YOUR feeding solid question will be answered too!

Love Super Baby Food! My first child is a terrific eater and I know it is from using your book. However baby number two is presenting a bit of a challenge. She’s 6 months and becoming really gassy after rice cereal. I don’t get it. I am still nursing and am very careful about what I ingest. We haven’t been able to really start other solids like avocado and banana because it is such a battle. Could it be the rice cereal? We were about the start the super porridge, but now I’m not so sure. Thoughts?

Ruth says:

NO BATTLES! Wait a week and then gently offer again. Try banana well mushed and liquidy-tastes like breastmilk. Ages 6 and 7 months are for LEARNING TO EAT. Not until 8 months will you baby actually need calories from solid foods to supplement breastmilk. Wait a few days, try again, and let me know how things worked out. Never force or push! 🙂 (Rice cereal and gas – I’m not surprised. I’d be willing to bet that the cereal as first food will be changed to banana some day.) Make sure your baby is getting an iron supplement and a vitamin D supplement-ask your pediatrician.

If you have any feeding solid food questions, do not hesitate to leave  a comment here.  Ruth would love to hear from you and to help.

Jun 302011
 

Parents want to know: Does baby food need salt or sugar?

Ruth says:

When you are preparing homemade baby food, such as Super Baby Porridge, never add salt or sugar. Sugar causes cavities in the teeth and adds empty calories to your baby’s diet.  Not only does sugar contain no nutrients, it actually uses up your baby’s existing nutrients from other foods for its digestion.  Although salt is needed by your baby’s body, he gets plenty of it from natural unsalted food.  Salt is an acquired taste and you should not promote a love of salt in your baby’s taste buds.  Simply stated, bland is best for your baby’s diet!

Jun 282011
 

Moms Are Talking About: Feeding Juice to Baby

Specifically, do babies need juice?  If so, at what age and how much juice does he need?

Ruth says:

The American Academy of Pediatrics says to feed no more than 4-6 ounces of juice to a child and only after 6 months old, if at all. Too much sugar. Juice should NOT be given in bottles or in sippy cups that can be drunk all day long, bathing the teeth in sugar. Only water should be in sippy cups. Thanks for writing!

Jun 192011
 

Moms are talking about: Baby Food Snacks

It’s not unusual for a baby to eat only one major meal a day, with the rest of his food coming from snacking.  Snacks are necessary in a baby’s diet and should consist of smaller portions of the same healthy foods that are part of larger meals. A baby may not begin eating three baby-sized meals until he is 10 months old, although he may start as early as 4 months.

When Should Snacks Be Offered to Your Super Baby During the Day?

Snacks should be offered at scheduled, predictable times every day and not at random.  Snacks should be eaten in the feeding area, as main meals are, because they ARE meals.

Read more about Super Snacks at the Super Baby Food Blog.

The following are some example of Super Baby Food Snacks:

  • SOFT pieces of wedges of ripe peeled and cored fruit
  • SOFT pieces of cooked, diced vegetables
  • Oatios or another brand of health store equivalent of Cheerios
  • Small lumps of cottage cheese
  • well-cooked pasta pieces
  • cooked brown rice or other grains

For a complete list of Super Baby Snacks as well as recipes for Toddler Hors d’oeuvres, check out Super Baby Food!

Jun 082011
 

Moms Wonder…

babies drinking waterDo babies need water? If  so, when, where and why?

Ruth says:

Exclusively breastfed babies do not need any extra water.  Formula-fed babies may have a few ounces of extra water (up to 4 ounces) per day on hot days.   However, when babies start solid foods, they should be given a few sips of water from a cup with any solid foods meal to help the kidneys.  Never give juice in the cup or bottle, only water or milk.  Teach your baby to learn to like plain water so he will develop a life-long habit of drinking plain water instead of sweetened beverages.

Jun 052011
 
raw-dairy-products-for-baby

Moms Are Talking About…

Raw Dairy Products for Their Baby.  We asked Ruth, Are raw dairy products  safe to feed to baby?

Ruth says:

In a word – “Nope”

Here’s why:

Milk and cheese made from raw milk have not been pasteurized–heated sufficiently to kill dangerous bacteria. The American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Dietetic Association say to NOT feed any baby milk, cheese, or any dairy products that are raw (have not been pasteurized).  Babies’ immune systems are not mature enough to fight bacteria that might have contaminated them and some bacteria could be lethal.  Anyone who is “immunocompromised” should not eat raw dairy products, including babies and young children, the elderly, and those with an illness.  And I believe the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommend that NO ONE, even very healthy adults, should eat raw dairy products, especially those who are immunocompromised.

May 262011
 

Moms Are Talking About…

Feeding Cottage Cheese to Your Baby

Cottage Cheese baby foodThe American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends dairy products (yogurt, natural cheeses, cottage cheese) made from whole milk because babies need fats.  As for all new foods, use the four-day wait rule.  Keep in mind that these fats are the saturated kind, which should be minimized in older children’s diets.  So when your baby becomes a toddler at age 1-2 years, you may want to switch to low-fat or non-fat dairy products, depending on which your professional baby care provider recommends and the age to switch.  I recommend buying only ORGANIC dairy products, which are from cows that are not treated with antibiotics or BVG (bovine growth hormone) and graze on grass with no pesticides.

Although it’s OK to give your child dairy products like yogurt and cheese made from cow’s milk, do not feed cow’s milk itself to your baby until s/he is one year old.  Until one year, give your baby breastmilk or formula and no cow’s milk, because cow’s milk protein is different from the protein in breastmilk/formula.  Be sure all dairy and cheeses you give to your baby are pasteurized and not made from raw milk.  Start your baby on dairy only if there are no milk allergies in the family–consult your pediatrician as to whether to introduce dairy to your baby.  In fact, if there are ANY allergies in the family (food allergies, asthma, pollen, etc.) , especially in the immediate family, discuss them thoroughly with your baby care povider.

By the way, if you haven’t given yogurt or kefir to your baby yet, you may wish to choose these dairy products over cottage cheese because they have the healthy bacteria so necessary for your baby’s digestive and immune systems.

For more information on dairy products and your baby, check Super Baby Food or right back her at the Super Baby Food Blog.

May 252011
 

Baby Led WeaningMoms are talking about…

Baby Led-Weaning

There is a DVD available on this subject.  I paid $90! for it and then realized the entire DVD can be viewed on YouTube for free.  There is also a book on it by Gill Rapley and Tracey Murkett called Baby Led Weaning.  Google “baby led weaning” and lots of information will come up on it. I can’t really say anything official about Baby Led Weaning because the AAP (American Academy of Pediatrics) and the ADA (American Dietetic Association) have not yet taken a stance.

However, in my opinion, parents should lovingly offer the correct age-appropriate food with no pressure or goading to eat it.  And it should be up to the baby to decide which foods and how much to eat.  I would not be surprised if we starting switching over to Baby Led Weaning from the way we currently feed babies.  With Baby Led Weaning (BLW), the baby never gets fed from a spoon by the parent.  The baby either feeds him/herself with his hands or feeds himself with the spoon himself. By the baby feeding herself, she decides herself when she is full.  This may help prevent obesity because the baby depends on her satiety signals for when to stop instead of depending on the parent to decide for her.  I personally think BLW is a great idea. Also, advocates of BLW say it’s much easier for the parent since they don’t do the puree thing.  For more information on BLW check out this terrific article on wholesomebabyfood.com.

May 122011
 

A mom had a question on the Super Baby Food Facebook Page about feeding a baby radishes!

Are radishes OK to feed a baby?

Here is what Ruth had to say:

Radishes technically are OK to give to a 9 month old, but I would suggest giving very little and very well diced – use a garlic press and knife to get it into the smallest pieces.  Radishes might cause stomach upset and may be difficult for your baby’s immature system to digest.  Try just a little tiny pea-sized bit and wait a day or so to see if your baby has any reaction.

Use only organic radishes and herbs and spices.

You can add herbs and spices anytime after 6 months, but I would first start with spices that are not hot.  Try a little cinnamon, or ginger first, then move on to turmeric (a SUPER spice loaded with good stuff), cumin, and others.  Stay away from the hot ones, such as cayenne pepper and garlic, for a while.  Introduce in very small quantities and, as always for new foods, use the 4-day wait rule.  Spices are loaded with antioxidants and are super foods, however, do NOT use imported spices, as they may have heavy metals (lead, mercury) in them.

I like the Frontier brand.  All their spices are organic and you can find them at the natural foods store or large grocery stores like Wegman’s.
http://www.frontiercoop.com/products/spices.php

TIP: If your mouth gets too hot from hot or peppery spices, cool it down with milk, which cools better than water or juice.

Thanks for writing!

Does anyone else have a question regarding a vegetable?  Send them to Ruth!

Apr 272011
 

In the last blog post, we listed some signs of readiness for solid foods that you and your pediatrician will look for to determine whether your baby is ready for solid foods.  Remember to discuss these signs with your pediatrician to make the determination whether you baby is ready for solid foods.

Here are more signs of readiness:

  • Baby is at least four months old.
  • Baby is drinking at least 32-40 ounces of formula per 24 hours and still wants more.
  • Baby is breast feeding at least 8-10 times per 24 hours, empties both breasts at each feeding, and still wants more.
  • The time between feedings becomes shorter and shorter over a period of several days.
  • Baby can bring an object in her hand directly to her mouth.
  • Baby shows interest in others eating around her.
  • Baby becomes fussy in the middle of the night, whereas before she slept through with no problem.

For these and other great tips for feeding baby check out the book, Super Baby Food. For immediate information, try the Super Baby Food app, free for a limited time.

Apr 252011
 

In a previous blog post we talked about some reasons why starting baby food is not such a good idea. In this blog post and the next, we’ll go in the other direction and list some signs of readiness for solid foods.  If you would like to introduce solid foods to your baby, discuss it with your pediatrician and do whatever you and your pediatrician agree is best for your baby.

Here are some signs of readiness of solid foods:

  • Baby is at least four months old.
  • Baby weighs twice as much as her birth weight
  • Baby weighs at least 13-15 pounds
  • Baby can sit with support, allowing her to lean forward when she wants another spoonful and backward to refuse.
  • Baby has control over her head and neck muscles and can turn her head to refuse food.
  • Baby has stopped exhibiting the extrusion reflex when you put a spoon in her mouth.  If after several tries, food comes right back out of her mouth when you spoon feed her, she is not yet ready for solid foods.

Stay tuned for Part 2 of this blog post for more sign of readiness for solid baby food.  For more information on feeding baby consult the Super Baby Food book or the Super Baby Food App (free for a limited time)!

Apr 212011
 

In Part 1, we reviewed some baby first foods.  Here are some other great first food choices.

Mashed ripe banana is an excellent first food for baby.  Bananas are nutritious and very easy for your baby to digest.  Many other cultures use bananas exclusively as their first baby food.  Try to buy only organically-grown bananas.

Mashed, ripe avocado is also an excellent first food for baby.  Avocados are extremely nutritious and contains the fatty acids that your baby needs for brain development.

Cooked, mashed sweet potato is another favorite first food for babies who are at least 4 months old.  It, too, is highly nutritious and filled with beta carotene (vitamin A).

Yogurt is a good first baby food for babies who are at least 6 months old.  Whole milk yogurt, the plain variety, instead of low-fat yogurt, is recommended because your baby needs fats. Remember that yogurt, in the under 1 year old, should not be fed in place of breastmilk or formula, but may be fed as an additional first food.

For an informative video that describes baby’s first foods, check out the video starring Ruth Yaron and Cindy Crawford.

Stay tuned for more information to feed your baby right here at the Super Baby Food Blog.

Apr 182011
 

If the most popular question about feeding baby is “When”, the second most popular question has got to be, “What?” In a recent post we discussed your baby’s first meal.   In this post and the next, we will cover, in a bit more detail some first food choices for your baby.

The first foods you should feed your baby are those that are easily digested and least likely to trigger an allergic reaction.  The most recommended first food is commercial iron-enriched baby cereal.  You and your pediatrician should decide which food should be given to your baby at her very first meal.

Commercial iron-fortified baby rice cereal is the first choice of the American Academy of Pediatrics.  Rice is easily digested, is rarely an allergen, and thins readily when added to liquid.  Most commercial cereals, are refined and processed.  Earth’s best brand, however, is not.  It is made from whole brown rice and is organic.  If you would like to you a commercial brand, I suggest you use Earth’s Best.

If your baby is at least 6 months old, I recommend homemade whole grain brown rice or millet cereal as baby’s first food (ie. Super Baby Porridge).  These cereals are easily digested, but your baby must be at least 6 months old before he has the necessary digestive enzymes to handle the complex carbohydrates in these cereals.

For an informative video that describes baby’s first foods, check out the video starring Ruth Yaron and Cindy Crawford.

Stay tuned for Part 2 of First Foods right here at the Super Baby Food Blog.

Apr 062011
 

Every parent’s worst nightmare is a baby who they fear is not eating enough.  If you feel that something is wrong with your baby’s eating habits and/or his weight is dropping, your first stop, as always, is with your pediatrician.  You might also find a registered dietitian in your area.  This site will help you find one: EatRight.org.

Your baby should be physically growing and learning skills and milestones.  Is he meeting his developmental milestones? You may want to pick up a copy of this book from your local library: The Wonder years: Helping Your Baby and Young Child Successfully Negotiate The Major Developmental Milestones by the American Academy of Pediatrics.  I get a lot of emails from the parents of picky eaters and it is almost always the case that they begin eating lots of food after the age of 8 months when they start moving.  Is your baby crawling a lot?  The more babies move, the hungrier they get and the more they should eat for all the extra energy they need.

There are some great books on picky eaters, too.  Try Food Chaining, it talks about the difference between picky eaters and children who have serious eating disorders.  Whatever you decide to do, make sure you keep your pediatrician involved.

Mar 252011
 

In the Super Baby Food,  I write about the “food serving.”  Here’s more information about the “food serving” as it relates to your baby.

The amount of food in a serving varies tremendously with the day and the baby.  The formal, technical definition of a baby food serving is “however much your baby will eat.”  The point is that there is no absolute size or standardized amount of food that constitutes a serving for a baby.  But to give you rough idea, the hypothetical average beginning eater’s food serving probably falls somewhere between 1 and 4 tablespoons.

A major part of the Super Baby Food System is the preparation of ice-cube sized frozen vegetable cubes.  For beginners, a serving size is generally 1/2 veggie cube to 2 veggie cubes. Start by giving your beginning eater a food cube made by filling the ice cube about half-way.  If she wants another, she”ll let you know.

Another major part of the Super Baby Food System is the home-making of whole grain cereals, like Super Baby Porridge.  A food serving of homemade cereal for beginning eaters is 1/4 – 1/2 cup of cooked cereal.  This equates to 1-2 tablespoons of dry uncooked cereal before it’s stirred into boiling water.  Remember that “baby serving’ is VERY flexible.  All babies are different and all appetites are different – it’s simply a rough idea.  Give your baby as much as he will eat, but watch carefully for signals that he has had enough, and don’t try to feed him more food after he loses interest.

Watch for our next blog post on similar-sized food servings to help with the balance of your baby’s Super Baby Food Diet.

Mar 232011
 

In a previous post, we outlined the Super Baby Food Food Cube Freezing method.  Freezing food is an important step. Thawing the food is the next important step.  It’s important to thaw the food “safely.”  “Safely” here has two meanings.  First, baby food should be thawed in a way which prevents bacterial growth.  Baby food should never be thawed at room temperature, and baby food should not be kept at room temperature for more than several minutes.  Second, “safely” means thawing baby food so that it is not too hot or too cold to be a danger to your baby.  If it’s too hot, it may burn your baby’s mouth.  If it is too cold, and therefore not thawed thoroughly, it may contain frozen food chunks that are choking hazards to your baby.  Food that is too cold may also “burn” your baby’s sensitive mouth.  In thawing food, you simply want to take the chill out of baby’s food, you don’t want to make it hot.

Here are a few ways to safely thaw those frozen baby food cubes:

Thaw Food Cubes on the Stove Top:

Place frozen food cube in a pot and thaw over very low heat stirring often.  A double broiler can also be used.  This method takes a while so begin to warm the cubes 15 minutes to 1/2 hour before mealtime.

Thaw Food Cubes in the refrigerator:

Thaw overnight in the refrigerator.  Be sure to stir insuring that no frozen chunks are left.  If you need to warm the food a bit, place container in a larger container with hot tap water.

Thaw Food Cubes In the Microwave:

Many experts recommend avoiding the microwave altogether because of the uneven heating that microwaves are notorious for.  It’s a fact that parents use the microwave regardless so, if you are going to use the microwave to thaw, be careful.  Place the frozen cubes in a little microwave-safe bowl.  With experience you will know exactly how long to thaw a frozen cube, probably between 30 seconds and a minute.  Once thawed almost all the way through, mash the remaining cube to even out the temperature.

Here are a few tips to make sure that baby’s food will be safe for baby to eat:

  • Stir, stir, stir baby food thoroughly to distribute heat
  • Always test the temperature of your baby’s food BEFORE feeding to your baby
  • Never re-freeze thawed baby food!

For additional information, check out Super Baby Food and check back with us here at the Super Baby Food blog.  Remember to subscribe to our feed to keep up with informative blog posts!

Mar 212011
 

With regard to a baby’s or toddler’s diet, the word “snacks” is a misnomer.  We adults tend to think of snacks as sweet little bits of foods that we eat for enjoyment more than to assuage hunger or to provide nutrition.  This is not true for your baby or toddler.  Super Baby Food “Super Snacks” are not extras, but a necessary part of your baby or toddler’s  daily diet that adds calories and nutrition! Of course, baby’s and toddler’s are different.  Below is a simple, nutritious Super Snack recipe for a Toddler.  The Super Baby Food Blog will be sharing many more Toddler and Baby Super Snack information and recipes, so come back and visit often!

Toddler Hors d’oeuvre Recipe:

Fresh Fruit Hors d’oeuvres

1 ripe mashed banana, or some avocado or other mashed fruit

1/2 C chopped nuts, (if not allergic, of course)

2 teaspoons honey

Do not cook but form into balls and refrigerate or freeze!

There are plenty more recipes in Super Baby Food, or check back with us us here at the blog! Happy Super Snacking!

Mar 102011
 

Feeding solid foods is such an important milestone in you and your baby’s life.  It is always important to remember safety first.  Below are some safety tips for feeding baby solids.

  • Make sure that wall mountings, electrical outlets, and objects on counter tops are out of baby’s reach from the feeding chair.
  • Your baby should not be able to grab something and use it for leverage to tip chair over.
  • Never leave your baby alone in a high chair.
  • Never allow older children to play in baby’s high chair or hang onto it.
  • Always use the full restraint system including the waist and middle straps when seating baby in the high chair- never use just the tray alone.
  • Remember to clean the chair and the restraint system on a regular basis.
  • Your baby should be seated in an upright position in the high chair or infant seat in order to prevent choking during eating
  • Remember to stop using the seat when your child has reached the recommended maximum height or weight.

For more safety tips while feeding solids check out the Super Baby Food App (available for free for a limited time), check out Super Baby Food or check back to the blog!

Mar 022011
 

After the birth of the baby, the next biggie milestone will be starting solids. The biggest question parents ask is: When Should I Start Feeding My Baby Solid Foods? The answer is not the same for every baby and starts with a call to the pediatrician!  Most pediatricians say start solids between 4 and 6 months, and closer to 6 months if you are breastfeeding.   Here are six reasons to wait before starting solid foods:

  1. Your baby’s immature digestive system is not ready to break down starches and carbohydrates like those found in cereals. His body cannot yet digest some fats. High protein foods like eggs, meat, and even cow’s milk, if given too early, may cause problems with your baby’s immature kidneys.
  2. Babies have a Tongue/Thrust Reflex which pushes food forward and out of the mouth making it difficult to spoon feed.
  3. Your baby is not yet able to indicate he is full. Until he can turn his head away from the spoon, you may unintentionally over feed him.
  4. Feeding solids too early can potentially lead to future medical problems (i.e. obesity, asthma, food allergies).
  5. Solids won’t help your baby sleep through the night.
  6. If you are breastfeeding, giving solids may cause a decrease in your milk production.If you are breastfeeding, giving solids may cause a decrease in your milk production.

For more information on starting solids, check back for future posts right here on the subject.  You can also check out the new Super Baby Food app that has an entire section dedicated to feeding baby solid foods and, of course, there is always more information to be found in Super Baby Food!

Feb 242011
 

Moms are talking about Brewer’s Yeast.  They want to know what it is, why is important, if they can feed it their babies and if so how?  Brewer’s yeast is a nutritional supplement powder that is high in protein, the B Vitamins, trace elements and other nutrients.  Taking a few seconds to add brewer’s yeast into your baby’s morning Super Porridge gives it a super nutrition boost.  You can try Brewers Yeast when your baby is 6 months old.  Be sure to use the Four Day Wait Rule.  At this age use just 1/2 teaspoon mixed into Super Porridge and then between 8-12 months begin using 1 teaspoon.

Feb 072011
 

You have spoken and we have listened.  We proudly present the Super Baby Food Diet Daily Worksheet, free for you to download at your leisure. This is the same worksheet featured in Ruth Yaron’s Super Baby Food.

We know this tool will help your meet your Super Baby feeding needs! Click here to download The Super Baby Food Diet Daily Worksheet.

Feb 032011
 

A mom recently sent me an email about Super Porridge concerned that her preparation of it was sometimes  “too lumpy” for her little guy.  Her baby is 7 months old and at this point she is feeding him oatmeal and millet.  Here are some pointers to avoid lumpy porridge.  For more detailed info check the Super Porridge Cereal chapter in Super Baby Food.

  1. Make sure that you are grinding the oats and the millet thoroughly enough to a form a powder, grinding in a blender for at least two full minutes.
  2. Make sure that your water to grain ratio is correct.  For Oatmeal that is one cup of oatmeal to two cups of water for 15 minutes.  For millet, that is 3 cups of water to one cup of millet for 45 minutes (or 3  tablespoons millet to one cup of water for a smaller portion.) (See chart in Super Baby Food on page 222)
  3. Once the water is boiling, reduce heat to lowest setting and THEN sprinkle the ground rice, stirring briskly with a wire whisk.
  4. Stir frequently at first, then again after the super porridge has had a few minutes to cool.

Super Porridge by Super Baby Food Author, Ruth Yaron

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Jan 272011
 

One of the most popular topics in my book, Super Baby Food is also the most important part of The Super Baby Food Diet described in the book.  I call it, Super Porridge.  Super Porridge is easy to make, full of organic, superior nutrition AND money saving.  What’s more, the porridge is flexible so that it can be part of a toddler diet, a young person’s diet, and even Mom and Dad’s diet.

Super Porridge is made from whole grains.  It’s super easy to make.   Making your own baby food is not only the best you can offer your baby it is also amazingly satisfying experience.   As your baby grows,  just a few tweaks to consistency and ingredients can provide the flexibility to keep your baby satisfied and growing.

In this blog post, I am going to share the basic Super Porridge recipe.

Remember: most babies will start “solid” foods between the ages of 4 – 6 months.  Check with your pediatrician before starting on solid foods before you get your baby started on solid food.

  • Measure 1 cup of water on the stove to boil.
  • Measure ¼ cup brown rice into your blender. Grind well, for about 2 minutes. (it’s going to be very loud, but it’s important to let the blender grind the brown rice down)  If you have a coffee grinder, you may find it works better than a blender.  Do not use a food processor as it does not grind grains well.
  • When the water starts to boil on the stove, turn the heat down to the lowest setting.
  • Sprinkle the ground rice into the water while stirring briskly with a wire whisk.
  • Cover the pot and keep it on low heat for about 10 minutes.
  • Stir frequently with the whisk to prevent scorching on the bottom and to remove lumps.
  • Let cool

The recipe above will yield 2 – ½ cup servings for your baby.  Feed some now and save some for later by dividing the porridge in 3 individual containers with lids.  Cooked Super Porridge will keep in the refrigerator for 2-3 days. Other grains that can be used to make Super Porridge for baby include: Quinoa, Barley, Oatmeal, and Millet. Once baby reaches 9 months, Super Porridge can be infused with more protein by adding the ground legumes to the ground brown rice or other grains and prepared as above.

My Super Porridge is  practical, nutritionally superior, easy to make and cost-saving – your baby will thank you for it someday. More information can be found in my book Super Baby Food and in future blog posts.  You can watch Cindy Crawford demonstrate the making of Super Porridge by visiting our You Tube account.

Jan 252011
 

Everybody is talking about kale and how to prepare it to feed your baby.  Kale is a Super Duper Green!  Get your baby used to the flavor and stir a kale cube into your baby’s Super Porridge as often as possible!

To prepare Kale:

  • swish in a sink full of cold water
  • remove the stems
  • Place washed greens in a dish and cover.  (Don’t add water, the rinsing water still left clinging to the leaves is enough for cooking)
  • Microwave on high about 7 minutes per pound.
  • Stir halfway through cooking time.
  • Let stand covered for 2 minutes
  • Puree and freeze using the  Food Cube Method for up to 2 months.

Remember that:

Baby must be at least 9 months old for cooked greens, 10 months old for finely chopped raw greens.

The FDA cautions that nitrates in kale, and other vegetables, could be dangerous to your baby before he is 7 months old.

Here is more information about nitrates in baby food from www.wholesomebabyfood.com.

Enjoy your kale!

Jan 172011
 

We are thrilled that Kourtney Kardashian thinks so much of Super Baby Food that she highlights the book’s merits in the February issue of  Parenting Magazine.  Kourtney was thrilled to report that she “makes her own baby food.”  Of course, we at Super Baby Food could not be happy for her.

We are excited that Kourtney is helping to spread the news that making your own baby food is not only providing the best possible nutrition for your baby, it is also practical, easy, money-saving, and extremely satisfying.    Thanks for spreading the word about the merits of Super Baby Food, Kourtney, and best of luck to you and Mason! Continue reading »

Jan 142011
 

Moms Are Talking About… Blenders

Do you have a favorite blender that you can recommend to your fans to make baby food preparation a snap?

I am still using the Oster blender that I purchased 32 years ago.  I think it’s going to last forever!
Of course, if you are rich, the top of the line blender is the Vitamix, and that’s the one I would recommend if money were no object. Otherwise, the regular brand names are fine for the most part for pureeing veggies and fruits and making smoothies.  For Super Porridge or grinding flax seeds and other seeds and nuts, I recommend the Tribest blender.  It’s a workhorse, and again, you can expect it to work for a long, long time.  I like that you can put all parts that touch the food in the dishwasher.  For grinding flax seeds, nuts, and grains, you can also use a coffee grinder, but you must clean it out very well after each use because the oils in the seeds and nuts get rancid quickly; this tends to be difficult with some coffee grinders.  You can also use the Tribest to make smoothies and it comes with different parts, depending on the model you buy.    I’ve heard that the Magic Bullet can be run continuously for only 30 seconds.  In my opinion, it’s no Tribest.  Before I buy a small kitchen appliance, I always read reviews at Amazon.com and on QVC.com and HSN.com.  They are from real people with experience on the products. What has been your experience with blenders?  Do you have any “blender tips” to share?