Jan 282012
 

Dr Greene.com recently asked Ruth to be a special guest perspectives blogger on their informational website.  Ruth was more than happy to provide 5 terrific blog posts sharing all kinds of great, detailed information on finger foods and tips for getting started with finger foods for babies and toddlers. In case you missed it, here is a description and a link to each fantastic blog post.

Finger Foods: What They Are And Why They Are Important To Your Baby’s Diet

Getting Started With Finger Foods

Finger Food Ideas For Baby and Toddler: Fruits, Whole Grains, and Vegetables

Baby and Toddler Finger Food Ideas Galore: Proteins, Dairy, Omega 3 Healthy Fats

Baby and Toddler Finger Food Ideas Galore: Seeds and Dips

Super Baby Food is happy to be a part of the Dr. Greene team! Be sure to check out some of the other terrific information on Dr. Greene’s website.

Jan 272012
 

Super Baby Food loves Dr. Greene. Below is a video which announces Dr. Greene’s White-out campaign.

To learn more about The White Out Campaign, you can visit Dr. Greene’s website: DrGreene.com.

Jun 212011
 

Moms are talking about:

How to get the exclusively breastfed baby ready for solid foods:

Ruth Says:

Thanks for using my book. It’s great that you are breastfeeding!  One thing you can do right now to make your little sweetie more accepting to new flavors is to eat a variety of flavors yourself.  The flavors will be in your breastmilk, so eat foods like cabbage, broccoli, sweet potatoes, whole grains and beans, and all the super foods that are loaded with nutrition.

There are a few chapters of Super Baby Food that you should read in their entirety before you start feeding solid foods.  The chapters about food safety and setting up the feeding area, as it says on page v in the front of the book.  You may want to ask your pediatrician for a vitamin supplement for her – one with vitamin D and iron and perhaps zinc.  These are important nutrients that your baby will start needing at around 6 months.

Enjoy!

Ruth

To read more about starting solids, try the new Super Baby Food ebook available on Super Baby Food.com.

May 122011
 

A mom had a question on the Super Baby Food Facebook Page about feeding a baby radishes!

Are radishes OK to feed a baby?

Here is what Ruth had to say:

Radishes technically are OK to give to a 9 month old, but I would suggest giving very little and very well diced – use a garlic press and knife to get it into the smallest pieces.  Radishes might cause stomach upset and may be difficult for your baby’s immature system to digest.  Try just a little tiny pea-sized bit and wait a day or so to see if your baby has any reaction.

Use only organic radishes and herbs and spices.

You can add herbs and spices anytime after 6 months, but I would first start with spices that are not hot.  Try a little cinnamon, or ginger first, then move on to turmeric (a SUPER spice loaded with good stuff), cumin, and others.  Stay away from the hot ones, such as cayenne pepper and garlic, for a while.  Introduce in very small quantities and, as always for new foods, use the 4-day wait rule.  Spices are loaded with antioxidants and are super foods, however, do NOT use imported spices, as they may have heavy metals (lead, mercury) in them.

I like the Frontier brand.  All their spices are organic and you can find them at the natural foods store or large grocery stores like Wegman’s.
http://www.frontiercoop.com/products/spices.php

TIP: If your mouth gets too hot from hot or peppery spices, cool it down with milk, which cools better than water or juice.

Thanks for writing!

Does anyone else have a question regarding a vegetable?  Send them to Ruth!

May 042011
 

The number one rule when considering supplements for your baby is to discuss it with your pediatrician.  Between the two of you, you can determine the diet your baby has now and what might need to be supplemented.  With that in mind, here is some general information that you can use to start to talk about supplements for your baby.

Vitamin supplements are called supplements because they are meant to do just that – “supplement” a baby’s good diet.  Vitamin supplements are terrific because even a good diet can be lacking in nutrients due to improper storage of foods, too-early harvesting, and the lack of nutrients in our country’s depleted soils from poor farming methods.

Exclusively breast-fed babies are often prescribed a supplement containing vitamin D.  The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends this because breast milk may not have enough of this nutrient, which is produced by sunlight on skin.  Some, however, feel the need for Vitamin D as a supplement to a breastfeeding baby may not be necessary.  You can read that point of view here on Homemade Baby Food Recipes.com.

Once you discuss supplements with your pediatrician, be sure to give your baby his vitamin supplement with her meals, not on an empty stomach.  Vitamins work with food to help with chemical reactions in the body.  For many babies the method will be to exclusively breast feed your baby until 6 months old and add vitamin D, and possibly iron drops (we’ll talk more about iron in the next post).  Bottle fed babies will not need Vitamin D as a supplement as it is provided in formula.

In the next post we’ll discuss Iron and Fluoride as supplements.  For even more information on nutritional supplements including a terrific appendix of every vitamin known to man defined with the  nutritional needs of your baby by age check out the Super Baby Food book or check back here at the Super Baby Food Blog!

Apr 272011
 

In the last blog post, we listed some signs of readiness for solid foods that you and your pediatrician will look for to determine whether your baby is ready for solid foods.  Remember to discuss these signs with your pediatrician to make the determination whether you baby is ready for solid foods.

Here are more signs of readiness:

  • Baby is at least four months old.
  • Baby is drinking at least 32-40 ounces of formula per 24 hours and still wants more.
  • Baby is breast feeding at least 8-10 times per 24 hours, empties both breasts at each feeding, and still wants more.
  • The time between feedings becomes shorter and shorter over a period of several days.
  • Baby can bring an object in her hand directly to her mouth.
  • Baby shows interest in others eating around her.
  • Baby becomes fussy in the middle of the night, whereas before she slept through with no problem.

For these and other great tips for feeding baby check out the book, Super Baby Food. For immediate information, try the Super Baby Food app, free for a limited time.

Apr 252011
 

In a previous blog post we talked about some reasons why starting baby food is not such a good idea. In this blog post and the next, we’ll go in the other direction and list some signs of readiness for solid foods.  If you would like to introduce solid foods to your baby, discuss it with your pediatrician and do whatever you and your pediatrician agree is best for your baby.

Here are some signs of readiness of solid foods:

  • Baby is at least four months old.
  • Baby weighs twice as much as her birth weight
  • Baby weighs at least 13-15 pounds
  • Baby can sit with support, allowing her to lean forward when she wants another spoonful and backward to refuse.
  • Baby has control over her head and neck muscles and can turn her head to refuse food.
  • Baby has stopped exhibiting the extrusion reflex when you put a spoon in her mouth.  If after several tries, food comes right back out of her mouth when you spoon feed her, she is not yet ready for solid foods.

Stay tuned for Part 2 of this blog post for more sign of readiness for solid baby food.  For more information on feeding baby consult the Super Baby Food book or the Super Baby Food App (free for a limited time)!

Mar 312011
 

Your beginner eater has had her very first meal.  It’s now day two of solid foods and she is ready for another meal.   For the first week, give her one meal each day consisting of one single food – the same food you fed to her in her very first meal.  Give her some breast milk or formula before the solid food so that she is not too hungry when you spoon-feed her.   After she finishes the food you can give her the rest of the breast or formula.  For the first few days, each meal should be no more that a tablespoon before mixing with liquid.

At the beginning of the second week of solid foods, introduce your baby to one new food from the list below.  Wait 4-7 days (The Four Day Wait Rule) and watch for allergy symptoms before introducing another food.

  • ripe avocado
  • ripe banana
  • sweet potato
  • yogurt, whole-milk (6 months or older)
  • commercial, iron-fortified single-grain cereals: rice, barley, millet, oatmeal
  • mild fruits, cooked and strained apricots, nectarines, peaches, pears, plums, prunes

For more details on feeding baby his first solid meals check out  Super Baby Food or check back to the blog for more informative blog posts!

Mar 072011
 

You’ve decided that the time is right to start feeding solid foods to your baby. Congratulations!  The next step is to create an environment to encourage your little guy in his new adventure.  Here are some tips for creating a friendly solid food feeding zone:

  • Your baby’s feeding area should be a happy place to be. Use baby’s mealtime as quality time for bonding with your beautiful baby.
  • Make silly faces at your baby, smile, and talk to her during mealtime.
  • Allow your baby to participate as much as possible in the feeding process.
  • Praise the good ignore the bad.  Try making a game of eating to prevent food on the floor.

During your baby’s first meal, he should develop a sense of trust and relaxed mealtimes are part of the process.  Your baby will actually grow and develop better if he is feed in a loving environment. For more information on creating a safe and friendly “solid food” feeding zone, check out the Super Baby Food app or subscribe to the blog for additional blog posts on the subject!