Mar 282011
 


In the last Super Baby Food Blog post, we talked about the Serving Size of a Super Baby Food meal.  Size is important Also important is to balance your baby’s diet among the food groups.  To do just that, try this tip: keep food servings about the same size.  For example, if your baby’s vegetable servings are currently 2 food cubes, keep the fruit servings about the same size:  2 Food Cubes = 4 Tablespoons = 1/4 cup.  Make cooked cereal servings twice the size of fruit or veggie servings, because cooked cereal is mostly water.

For 2 veggie food cubes or 1/4 cup fruit, a similar sized cereal serving would be 1/2 cup of cooked cereal. (A half-cup of cooked cereal is only a few tablespoons of ground dry cereal before it is mixed with water).  Keeping food servings similar in size will help to promote in your baby’s diet a nice balance of nutrients from the different food groups. This is what we mean by “similar-sized” food servings.

Mar 252011
 

In the Super Baby Food,  I write about the “food serving.”  Here’s more information about the “food serving” as it relates to your baby.

The amount of food in a serving varies tremendously with the day and the baby.  The formal, technical definition of a baby food serving is “however much your baby will eat.”  The point is that there is no absolute size or standardized amount of food that constitutes a serving for a baby.  But to give you rough idea, the hypothetical average beginning eater’s food serving probably falls somewhere between 1 and 4 tablespoons.

A major part of the Super Baby Food System is the preparation of ice-cube sized frozen vegetable cubes.  For beginners, a serving size is generally 1/2 veggie cube to 2 veggie cubes. Start by giving your beginning eater a food cube made by filling the ice cube about half-way.  If she wants another, she”ll let you know.

Another major part of the Super Baby Food System is the home-making of whole grain cereals, like Super Baby Porridge.  A food serving of homemade cereal for beginning eaters is 1/4 – 1/2 cup of cooked cereal.  This equates to 1-2 tablespoons of dry uncooked cereal before it’s stirred into boiling water.  Remember that “baby serving’ is VERY flexible.  All babies are different and all appetites are different – it’s simply a rough idea.  Give your baby as much as he will eat, but watch carefully for signals that he has had enough, and don’t try to feed him more food after he loses interest.

Watch for our next blog post on similar-sized food servings to help with the balance of your baby’s Super Baby Food Diet.