Apr 212011
 

In Part 1, we reviewed some baby first foods.  Here are some other great first food choices.

Mashed ripe banana is an excellent first food for baby.  Bananas are nutritious and very easy for your baby to digest.  Many other cultures use bananas exclusively as their first baby food.  Try to buy only organically-grown bananas.

Mashed, ripe avocado is also an excellent first food for baby.  Avocados are extremely nutritious and contains the fatty acids that your baby needs for brain development.

Cooked, mashed sweet potato is another favorite first food for babies who are at least 4 months old.  It, too, is highly nutritious and filled with beta carotene (vitamin A).

Yogurt is a good first baby food for babies who are at least 6 months old.  Whole milk yogurt, the plain variety, instead of low-fat yogurt, is recommended because your baby needs fats. Remember that yogurt, in the under 1 year old, should not be fed in place of breastmilk or formula, but may be fed as an additional first food.

For an informative video that describes baby’s first foods, check out the video starring Ruth Yaron and Cindy Crawford.

Stay tuned for more information to feed your baby right here at the Super Baby Food Blog.

Mar 252011
 

In the Super Baby Food,  I write about the “food serving.”  Here’s more information about the “food serving” as it relates to your baby.

The amount of food in a serving varies tremendously with the day and the baby.  The formal, technical definition of a baby food serving is “however much your baby will eat.”  The point is that there is no absolute size or standardized amount of food that constitutes a serving for a baby.  But to give you rough idea, the hypothetical average beginning eater’s food serving probably falls somewhere between 1 and 4 tablespoons.

A major part of the Super Baby Food System is the preparation of ice-cube sized frozen vegetable cubes.  For beginners, a serving size is generally 1/2 veggie cube to 2 veggie cubes. Start by giving your beginning eater a food cube made by filling the ice cube about half-way.  If she wants another, she”ll let you know.

Another major part of the Super Baby Food System is the home-making of whole grain cereals, like Super Baby Porridge.  A food serving of homemade cereal for beginning eaters is 1/4 – 1/2 cup of cooked cereal.  This equates to 1-2 tablespoons of dry uncooked cereal before it’s stirred into boiling water.  Remember that “baby serving’ is VERY flexible.  All babies are different and all appetites are different – it’s simply a rough idea.  Give your baby as much as he will eat, but watch carefully for signals that he has had enough, and don’t try to feed him more food after he loses interest.

Watch for our next blog post on similar-sized food servings to help with the balance of your baby’s Super Baby Food Diet.

Mar 022011
 

After the birth of the baby, the next biggie milestone will be starting solids. The biggest question parents ask is: When Should I Start Feeding My Baby Solid Foods? The answer is not the same for every baby and starts with a call to the pediatrician!  Most pediatricians say start solids between 4 and 6 months, and closer to 6 months if you are breastfeeding.   Here are six reasons to wait before starting solid foods:

  1. Your baby’s immature digestive system is not ready to break down starches and carbohydrates like those found in cereals. His body cannot yet digest some fats. High protein foods like eggs, meat, and even cow’s milk, if given too early, may cause problems with your baby’s immature kidneys.
  2. Babies have a Tongue/Thrust Reflex which pushes food forward and out of the mouth making it difficult to spoon feed.
  3. Your baby is not yet able to indicate he is full. Until he can turn his head away from the spoon, you may unintentionally over feed him.
  4. Feeding solids too early can potentially lead to future medical problems (i.e. obesity, asthma, food allergies).
  5. Solids won’t help your baby sleep through the night.
  6. If you are breastfeeding, giving solids may cause a decrease in your milk production.If you are breastfeeding, giving solids may cause a decrease in your milk production.

For more information on starting solids, check back for future posts right here on the subject.  You can also check out the new Super Baby Food app that has an entire section dedicated to feeding baby solid foods and, of course, there is always more information to be found in Super Baby Food!