May 122011
 

Choosing, Picking, and Preparing Carrots to Feed your Baby

Carrots are loaded with beta-carotene, a form of vitamin A that is not toxic, even in large doses.  Your baby should get a vitamin A veggie every day!  Here are some details for feeding you baby carrots:

Age: Baby must be at least 7 months old for cooked carrots, 10 months for finely grated raw carrots.

Choosing: Carrots should be firm, and not pale.  The smaller the carrot, the sweeter the carrot.

Storing: Carrots need cold temperature and high humidity.  Store in the refrigerator in plastic bag with holes.  When properly stored, carrots retain their nutrients for up to two weeks.

Preparation for cooking: Nutrients are most concentrated in the peels of carrots and just below.  You don’t have to peel or scrape young or small carrots if you give them a good scrubbing with a vegetable brush.  Older, bigger carrots are probably better peeled.

Steaming: Steam whole carrots 15 minutes, carrot slices about 10 minutes.

Baking: Large carrots can be baked in the oven.  Scrub them and leave whole and unpeeled. Bake at 350 for 30 to 40 minutes.

Freezing: Freeze pureed carrots using the food cube method for up to 2 months.

For tips on preparing and feeding more vegetables, check out Super Baby Food book or check right back here at the Super Baby Food Blog.

Apr 252011
 

In a previous blog post we talked about some reasons why starting baby food is not such a good idea. In this blog post and the next, we’ll go in the other direction and list some signs of readiness for solid foods.  If you would like to introduce solid foods to your baby, discuss it with your pediatrician and do whatever you and your pediatrician agree is best for your baby.

Here are some signs of readiness of solid foods:

  • Baby is at least four months old.
  • Baby weighs twice as much as her birth weight
  • Baby weighs at least 13-15 pounds
  • Baby can sit with support, allowing her to lean forward when she wants another spoonful and backward to refuse.
  • Baby has control over her head and neck muscles and can turn her head to refuse food.
  • Baby has stopped exhibiting the extrusion reflex when you put a spoon in her mouth.  If after several tries, food comes right back out of her mouth when you spoon feed her, she is not yet ready for solid foods.

Stay tuned for Part 2 of this blog post for more sign of readiness for solid baby food.  For more information on feeding baby consult the Super Baby Food book or the Super Baby Food App (free for a limited time)!

Apr 212011
 

In Part 1, we reviewed some baby first foods.  Here are some other great first food choices.

Mashed ripe banana is an excellent first food for baby.  Bananas are nutritious and very easy for your baby to digest.  Many other cultures use bananas exclusively as their first baby food.  Try to buy only organically-grown bananas.

Mashed, ripe avocado is also an excellent first food for baby.  Avocados are extremely nutritious and contains the fatty acids that your baby needs for brain development.

Cooked, mashed sweet potato is another favorite first food for babies who are at least 4 months old.  It, too, is highly nutritious and filled with beta carotene (vitamin A).

Yogurt is a good first baby food for babies who are at least 6 months old.  Whole milk yogurt, the plain variety, instead of low-fat yogurt, is recommended because your baby needs fats. Remember that yogurt, in the under 1 year old, should not be fed in place of breastmilk or formula, but may be fed as an additional first food.

For an informative video that describes baby’s first foods, check out the video starring Ruth Yaron and Cindy Crawford.

Stay tuned for more information to feed your baby right here at the Super Baby Food Blog.

Jan 142011
 

Moms Are Talking About… Blenders

Do you have a favorite blender that you can recommend to your fans to make baby food preparation a snap?

I am still using the Oster blender that I purchased 32 years ago.  I think it’s going to last forever!
Of course, if you are rich, the top of the line blender is the Vitamix, and that’s the one I would recommend if money were no object. Otherwise, the regular brand names are fine for the most part for pureeing veggies and fruits and making smoothies.  For Super Porridge or grinding flax seeds and other seeds and nuts, I recommend the Tribest blender.  It’s a workhorse, and again, you can expect it to work for a long, long time.  I like that you can put all parts that touch the food in the dishwasher.  For grinding flax seeds, nuts, and grains, you can also use a coffee grinder, but you must clean it out very well after each use because the oils in the seeds and nuts get rancid quickly; this tends to be difficult with some coffee grinders.  You can also use the Tribest to make smoothies and it comes with different parts, depending on the model you buy.    I’ve heard that the Magic Bullet can be run continuously for only 30 seconds.  In my opinion, it’s no Tribest.  Before I buy a small kitchen appliance, I always read reviews at Amazon.com and on QVC.com and HSN.com.  They are from real people with experience on the products. What has been your experience with blenders?  Do you have any “blender tips” to share?